Search Homes Search Foreclosures What Is Home Worth

 Greewich Connecticut Has a Secluded Compound On The Market for $190 Million

Would You Pay $190 For An Isolated Compound in Greenwich Called Beech Farm?

Copper BeachCompound  in Greenwich on the market for $190 Million

Copper BeachCompound in Greenwich on the market for 190 Million

A grand estate in Greenwich, Connecticut known as Copper Beech Farm is on the market for $190 million, which would make it the most expensive home in the United States.

The current owner is timber magnate John Rudey, who reportedly purchased the property 31 years ago. The Victorian mansion was built in 1898 and was once owned by Harriet Lauder Greenway, the daughter of industrialist George Lauder who helped found U.S. Steel.

It is the first time the property has been publicly listed since 1904, according to the listing.

“This extraordinary Great Estate has no peers in Greenwich… there simply are no more in existence,” attempting to justify the price tag.

The 50.6-acre estate sits 40 feet above water and includes two undeveloped islands and about a mile of private shoreline in Greenwich’s exclusive Mead Point area. The 13,519-square-foot house features 12-bedrooms and 7-full bathrooms. Special touches include rooms with 12-foot ceilings, a marble bathroom, solarium and two oval bedrooms.

The Colonial estate also features a 75-foot pool, grass tennis court, greenhouses, six garages and a “stone carriage house complete with a clock tower, and a large upstairs with lovely water views has ample garage space for cars and farm equipment, plus the milking stalls from its original days,” according to the listing.

But the house has some quirks. The main kitchen is still in the basement with the staff quarters. And there are still old “speaking tubes” from pre-electricity days in the rooms, according to the Wall Street Journal.

The question now is whether Mr. Rudey will get the asking price.

, , , ,

Historic Castles and Mansions to see while driving in The United States!

Historic Castles and Mansions to see in The United States.

 

Castles

Who doesn’t go a bit giddy at the sight of a castle? The good news is that you don’t have to head to Europe for honest-to-goodness ones of the Cinderella variety—we have plenty right here in our own backyard. Railroad barons commissioned most of these estates, but at least one housed a legitimate king and queen (bet you didn’t know this country had its own history of royalty!). Each is an engineering wonder in its own right, with some even constructed out of old-world castles that were shipped across the ocean. And each is open to tours should you decide to make a trip (a select few will even let you spend the night). Read this and you might just discover a side of America you never knew existed.

Hearst Castle:

Hearst Castle
Understatement of the millennium: William Randolph Hearst’s 1919 directive to architect Julia Morgan to “build a little something” on his ranch in San Simeon. Then again, a 115-room “Casa Grande” inspired by a Spanish cathedral is a relatively modest proposition compared to the 250,000 acres and the 13 miles of coastline it’s set on. It’s when you add in the three additional Mediterranean Revival guesthouses (46 more rooms total), 127 acres of gardens, the Neptune pool with authentic Roman temple pediment, the zoo with roaming reindeer and zebra, Egyptian Sekhmet statues on the terraces, and the private airstrip that things get a bit over-the-top. Magnificent doesn’t begin to describe the museum-quality artwork, which drove the architecture as much as anything, from Renaissance statuary to Gothic tapestries and entire ceilings, nor the palatial scale of the publishing magnate’s vision for “La Cuesta Encantada” (The Enchanted Hill)—still unfinished upon his death in 1951. 750 Hearst Castle Rd., San Simeon, CA, 800/444-4445, hearstcastle.org. Admission from $25.

Bishops Castle, Galveston Texas

Bishop’s Palace (Photo: Galveston Historical Foundation / David Canright)Bishop’s Palace
Of all the Gilded Age Victorians built by Nicholas Clayton along Galveston’s Gulf Coast, the Bishop’s Palace (née Gresham Castles, 1893, after its original owner, Santa Fe railroad magnate Walther Gresham) remains the grandest—and not just because its steel and stone hulk survived the Great Storm of 1900. Its small lot and oversized proportions with château-esque detailing of steeply peaked rooflines and sculptural chimneys still dominate the street, while inside the 14-foot coffered ceilings, 40-foot octagonal mahogany stairwell, stained glass, plaster carvings, and Sienna marble columns exude richness. Keep a lookout for the bronze dragon sculptures. After serving as a Catholic bishop’s residence for 50 years, the house is now open for tours. Book a private guide to see the usually off-limits third floor. 1402 Broadway, Galveston, TX, 409/762-2475, galveston.com. Admission $10, private tours from $50.

Boldt Castle

What do you do when you come across a heart-shaped isle while vacationing with your wife in the Thousand Islands? If you’re upstart industrialist George Boldt, you buy it and hire 300 stonemasons, carpenters, and artists to build a six-story, 120-room testament to your love. There were Italian gardens, a dove-cote, and a turreted powerhouse, plus all the imported Italian marble, French silks, and Oriental rugs money could buy. But when his wife Louise died in 1904, the heartbroken Boldt ceased construction on the Rhineland-style Taj Mahal and left it to the elements for 73 years. Today, tourists can visit from May to October for self-guided tours—or book a wedding in the stone gazebo. +44° 20′ 40.29″ N, -75° 55′ 21.27″ W, Heart Island, Alexandria Bay, NY, 315/482-9724, boldtcastle.com. Admission $8.

Castle in the Clouds

Location, location, location—as important in castles to fending off conquers as forgetting Gilded Age woes. And for millionaire shoe baron Thomas Plant, that meant setting his 1914 Lucknow Estate (named after the Indian city he loved) on the rim of an extinct caldera high in the Ossipee Mountains with unbroken views over 6,300 private acres of woods and lakes. The mansion by comparison is relatively subdued: A mere 16 rooms, it’s practically minuscule compared to the other castles on this list. Throughout, the arts and crafts philosophy of artisanship and living in harmony with nature is expressed in the stone walls, inventive handiwork like the jigsaw floor in the kitchen, and functional decor that eschews ostentation—all planned at Plant’s 5-foot-4 height—plus a few technological innovations like a needle shower, self-cleaning oven, brine fridge, and central-vacuuming system. Much remains wholly preserved today. Route 171, 455 Old Mountain Rd., Moultonborough,

 For More Castles: please see http://travel.yahoo.com/ideas/12-awe-inspiring-american-castles.html

, , ,

Shannon Biszantz

Shannon Biszantz

Shannon Biszantz reviews

CalBRE #01787015
16236 San Dieguito Road, Suite 4-12,
Rancho Santa Fe, CA 92067

Work Cell: 619-417-4655
Office: 858-755-0075




Market Snapshot

Behind The Gate

Whispering Palms

Whispering Palms

Morgan Run

Popular Pages

Real Estate Communities

Schedule time with me